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5 Bike inventions You Should Have #3

5 Bike inventions  You Should  Have #3

More exciting bike inventions that will blow your mind
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5.I lock it:a fully automatic smart bike lock that is fixed to your bike frame. It locks and unlocks your bike automatically using Bluetooth low energy technology.

So no more pulling out your keys and struggling with your bike lock, you can just leave your bike and be sure it’s safe.

4Snikky Bike. combines the agile riding of a kick scooter with the stability/comfort of a road bike into an effortless electric vehicle.

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2.Helix a revolutionary new folding bike that is smaller, lighter, safer and easier to use than any other folding bike in the world.

1.Carbon SUV:

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✔ Top 5 bike inventions You Must Have #2

✔Top 5 Bicycle inventions You Must Have-Top 5 de los mejores gadget de ciclismo


Video Rating: / 5

Hambrock and Spetter explain that their goal is to create a more environmentally friendly transport for crowded urban settings. It’s unclear how the prototype is an improvement over conventional bicycles, which also do not generate pollution and are less physically demanding than the Fliz. However, Hambrock and Spetter say creating a healthier mode of transportation is also part of their vision for the Fliz.
The Daily Mail reports that Hambrock and Spetter have entered their design into this year’s James Dyson Award competition, which awards a £10,000 (,924) top prize to the winner.
A new bicycle designed by German engineers does away with pedals and instead requires the rider to run or walk to generate speed.
Dubbed the “Fliz Bike,” it is actually based on the world’s first bicycle, the “Laufrad,” which also operated without pedals and was created by German inventor Karl Drais in 1817.
“The prior aim of developing FLIZ was to bring a completely new driving experience to everyone,” designers Tom Hambrock and Juri Spetter write on their website. “Its laminated, innovative frame with 5 point belt system provides a comfortable, ergonomic ride between running and biking.”
Riders of the Fliz must strap themselves into a harness (the “5 point belt system”). After building up enough speed, they lift their legs onto footrests located near the bike’s rear wheel.
“The frame integrates the rider and due to its construction it works both like a suspension and like a top carrier whereas the belt replaces the saddle and adjusts your position,” the designers write.

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Ginzvelo :A futuristic car -bike for sale now .

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What do you get if you cross a bike with a car? ,900 Ginzvelo pod makes cycling safer – and pedalling charges a motor that lets you cruise along at speeds of 20mph
Sit-down bike can be pedalled but also boasts a 500-watt battery-powered motor to push it along for 100 miles on a single charge
Unlike conventional pushbikes, where the rider is exposed to the elements and other road users,
http://www.ginzvelo.com/

Nice Wind Powered Bicycles photos

A few nice wind powered bicycles images I found:

Chiara Biscontin, Orbita
wind powered bicycles
Image by The Glasgow School of Art
This year of designing became a research project within the realm of renewables. The aim was to design an energy harvester, which charges electronic devices on and off a bicycle. Different ways to harvest energy such as wind, vibration (piezoelectric) and electro magnetics were explored. Orbita was the result of a trial and error process. It is a system which comprises a generator, electric circuit and power bank. Each were individually designed with careful attention to detail. Orbita is targeted at commuters, but can be enjoyed by a series of other users. Cycling at an average speed of 12-15km/h it produces 5W of power when braking, which is a higher rating than average dynamos. The energy produced is stored in a power bank which is connected to the main generating hub. The power obtained can be used on-the- go or taken away by the user for later use. issuu.com/chiarabiscontin/docs/cbiscontin_portfolio1

“basket”
wind powered bicycles
Image by Payton Chung
Front end of a SmartBikeDC. This creates kind of a front basket, but when I first put something in (my backpack — nice to get the weight off) it tugged on one of the brake cables in a bad way. Might be good to tie those cables down.

Any three-speed Nexus bike will remind me of my folding bike. The SBDC ride is quite a bit better than that, though; I was even able to trackstand for about 20 seconds on it! The bikes have a low center of gravity and respectable wheelbase. The rear-wheel cover results in a funny wind-tunnel noise that might make you feel like you’re zooming down the street.

new_handlebars_and_light_9510
wind powered bicycles
Image by doviende
i borrowed some sweet aerobars from a friend. they should come in quite handy when riding into the wind. these are the bars where you crouch down and rest your elbows on the pads, and then your arms go straight forward onto the grippy thing.

the light below there is my new Nighthawk LED light that i picked up for night-time riding. It only has 1 LED, but DAMN is it bright! at full power it lasts for 5 hours, and lights up the road for 150 or something rediculous. all on 4 AA batteries. i’m planning to use it on 50% power (still bright enough for fast riding) so it’ll last 10 hours…basically the whole night.

In a few weeks i’ve got a 300km ride, so i should get a chance to use it for at least a couple of hours at night.

Futuristic & Odd Bicycles – www.freshcreation.nl

Futuristic & Odd Bicycles - www.freshcreation.nl

Here’s a collection of futuristic, prototype & odd bicycles. The bicycles were filmed by Fresh Creation during the Dutch Design Week and BrightLive in Holland. More info: www.freshcreation.nl
Video Rating: / 5

New Yorkers wear strange things around their necks

A few nice great bicycle ideas images I found:

New Yorkers wear strange things around their necks
great bicycle ideas
Image by Ed Yourdon
I have to admit that I’m not absolutely sure where this was taken in Greenwich Village. But from some of the details that I can see, my guess is that it was at the northwest corner of Hudson and Barrow Street. I’m sure there are people out there, somewhere, who will be able to rest more easily tonight with the additional tidbit of information …

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

Technicolor bicycle, on its own
great bicycle ideas
Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on 6th Avenue, between 9th and 10th Street

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

In New York, it’s very unusual to see the same person in two different places, on the same day
great bicycle ideas
Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at the corner of Perry & 7th Ave. About four hours earlier, I happened to photograph the same woman a few blocks away — at Abingdon Square, on 8th Ave and Hudson St. You can see it here on Flickr:

www.flickr.com/photos/yourdon/15766084172/

and also here:

www.flickr.com/photos/yourdon/15500870305/

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

Specialized S-Works Venge ViAS Di2 – Wind Tunnel Tested

BikeRadar’s US Editor-in-Chief Ben Delaney headed out to California to see, with the help of science, just how fast the new Specialized S-Works Venge ViAS Di2 bike really is.
Video Rating: / 5

Cool Bicycles Ideas images

Check out these bicycles ideas images:

Version 1.0 beta 1
bicycles ideas
Image by Petteri Sulonen
The vintage Monark project is nearing completion. Here’s version 1.0 beta — that is, I’ve got everything in it that’s in the final version, but it’s missing some testing and adjustment. That’s for tomorrow, because I just had a fairly solid dinner and my wife feels that the combination of a half a bottle of rosé wine and first experiments with fixed gear riding falls under the category of "bad ideas even if you’re wearing a helmet."

The rear wheel is near its extreme rear position, because being new to this sort of thing I’m not quite certain of my gear ratios, and I figure that I can always remove links from the chain while adding them could be a problem.

Tech information about the bike:

Frame: Monark racing frame from the 1950’s. Exact date not known. This is the first time it’s ever been built into a bike.

Rims, front hub, cranks, chainwheels, handlebars, stem: from an early-1970’s Motobécane "mixte" touring bike (I still have the frame; it’s quite nice, Tange double-butted steel, if you want it get in touch). The rims are Rigida extruded aluminum drop center, 700C size; the hub is Atom Normandy and there’s something slightly weird about it. The handlebars are especially nice; they’re engraved "Guidons Philippe."

The saddle, seatpost, rear hub, cog, and chain are new. The saddle is a Brooks B17, the rear hub is an I.R.O. track hub; the nice thing is that like the Atom front hub the styling is a Nuovo Record knock-off. The cog is a Shimano Dura-Ace 15-tooth 1/8", with a lock-ring. The chain is a Spectra stainless-steel one.

The seatpost is also new. The size on the frame is very rare, 23.8 mm. The closest I could find was a 24 mm chromed-steel post, so I sanded that down to size. It turned out OK.

The tires are Continental Contacts, 37 mm. I picked the pretty fat ones for two reasons. First, my intended main use is urban commuting, which means getting very friendly with curbstones, tram tracks, and such. (I once rode full-speed into a tram track on 23 mm tires. It was not much fun.) And second, the visual image I had in my head when starting on the project was a Whitworth Cycles advertising poster from around the year 1900, and that bike had pretty fat tires by modern standards.

I’m not quite sure I like the red handlebar tape after all; I wanted a splash of red to match the accents in the frame and fork, but this might be a bit loud. We’ll see after it gets a bit of use. The handlebars might need some adjustment, and perhaps the saddle some tweaking too. Ideally, I would have picked a frame about a cm or two larger, but I’m pretty sure I can get this one to work for me quite nicely enough.

The bike weighs in at about 9.5 kg — not bad for a 50-year-old frame and a build where I did not go gram-hunting the least bit.

Calm canal
bicycles ideas
Image by Éole
NIght is coming on Amsterdam.
The idea of putting the bicycle in the fields is an idea of Jérémie.

❤ 10 Bike Inventions – Future Bikes – You Must Have 【1080p】

These bike inventions will surprise you…. Top 10 Bike inventions you must have
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Top 10 Bike inventions you must have
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Bikes are awesome, but there are things about owning a bike that aren’t so great. Bikes get stolen. Bikes that are locked up get vandalized or have parts stolen. You can’t take your bike on the bus, subway or train during peak hours. Taking your bike on a trip means there is little room left for other things
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New Design, New Energy: Two Revolutionary Bikes from Europe – Hi-Tech

The Halfbike is a tricycle, made in Bulgaria, designed to be ridden standing up in order to work muscles that are not used when riding a conventional bicycle. The front wheel is driven by pedals while the back wheels pivot, so the rider steers by leaning from side to side.

In Lithuania, they are developing another unusual bicycle. It is called the Rubbee and offers riders the chance not to pedal at all! This lightweight electronic device can be attached to any bicycle in under a minute, and once it switched on, riders can let the engine do the work…

READ MORE : http://www.euronews.com/2014/04/23/revolutions-in-bike-design

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New Invention – VELLO bike: high performance folding bicycle

VELLO bike: a city bike revolution. It is a high performance, hand-made folding bicycle.
Support this project here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1844575826/vello-bike

It’s hip, it’s fast and it’s foldable in a second! A high-performance, hand-made and lightweight folding bike with innovative features designed for the perfect ride in the city!

A new city experience

VELLO bikes are folding bicycles developed for urban mobility. They include some of the best features of a city, racing and folding bike, while also integrating new functions to cope with the demands of the urban lifestyle. Its 20” wheels make the overall size of the bike smaller than most other bikes and more responsive, perfect for the city where many stop-go motions are part of your everyday commute.

The specially developed folding mechanism combined with a magnetic shock absorber ensures that the rear wheel can be brought forward with a simple rotary movement. This enables the bike to be rolled along everywhere; you can push it into a narrow lift or onto the subway. The front and rear lights are integrated into the frame and the foldable fenders protect your clothing in all types of weather.

Our story

Valentin is a product designer who’s been fascinated with mobility products and wheels ever since childhood. In preparation for a trip to the Caribbean with two friends he made the first prototypes of VELLO bike to explore all corners of the country by bike, bus, train and occasionally car.

The trip was a true inspiration, and so he joined forces with Valerie Wolff, bike lover and startup enthusiast, to design a bike that is user-centred and to plan the market entry. The team eventually expanded to include Jakob Illera and Paris Maderna, mechanical engineers and product developers, to work on the details and to perfect the bike. The process involved drawing, redrawing, modeling, remodeling, building and rebuilding, testing and retesting – until all involved felt confident enough to put their stamp of quality on the folding bike.

Now, 3 years down the road, we’re ready: we would now like to introduce the VELLO, a bike that combines ease of fold with high-performance.

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